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Motorsport,</br>the English way

Motorsport,
the English way

June 23, 2016: Every summer at Goodwood in West Sussex, esteemed British Lord and gentleman driver Charles March organises the Festival of Speed – an alternative take on the famous English garden party – quite literally in his own backyard. Over a four-day weekend, around an impeccably tended lawn in front of a 17th century stately home and in characteristically British weather conditions, this landmark event brings together Formula 1 machinery and rally cars, steam-powered and electric vehicles, iconic and high-powered models, soap box racers and futuristic prototypes.

In existence since 1993, this automotive garden party is unique in the world and now attracts no fewer than 200,000 motoring and motorsport aficionados.

Throughout the Goodwood grounds, gentlemen dressed in tweed jackets mingle with ladies in long summer dresses, extravagantly tattooed fans and small children all eager to catch a glimpse of their F1 heroes, who this year included world championship leader Nico Rosberg and team-mate Lewis Hamilto.

<p>Throughout the Goodwood grounds, gentlemen dressed in tweed jackets mingle with ladies in long summer dresses, extravagantly tattooed fans and small children all eager to catch a glimpse of their F1 heroes, who this year included world championship leader Nico Rosberg and team-mate Lewis Hamilto.</p>
<p>Throughout the Goodwood grounds, gentlemen dressed in tweed jackets mingle with ladies in long summer dresses, extravagantly tattooed fans and small children all eager to catch a glimpse of their F1 heroes, who this year included world championship leader Nico Rosberg and team-mate Lewis Hamilto.</p>

As they enjoy an impromptu picnic, spectators tuck into fish and chips washed down with a cup of tea or a glass of Pimm’s, while watching an overhead display by the Royal Air Force and admiring the stand of a manufacturer unveiling its very latest model.

From getting up close and personal to some of the world’s most legendary automotive creations to sharing motorsport memories with Jean Ragnotti or talking tech with Jackie Stewart... all of this is only possible at Goodwood.

Following an auction of exceptional vehicles, the Hill Climb begins. The undisputed highlight of the Festival, this pitches cars of every kind and every era against each other in a one-at-a-time race against the clock up a two-kilometre straw bale-lined blast – all in an atmosphere characterised by consummate class, good humour and a sense of fair play.

<p>Following an auction of exceptional vehicles, the Hill Climb begins. The undisputed highlight of the Festival, this pitches cars of every kind and every era against each other in a one-at-a-time race against the clock up a two-kilometre straw bale-lined blast – all in an atmosphere characterised by consummate class, good humour and a sense of fair play.</p>
<p>Following an auction of exceptional vehicles, the Hill Climb begins. The undisputed highlight of the Festival, this pitches cars of every kind and every era against each other in a one-at-a-time race against the clock up a two-kilometre straw bale-lined blast – all in an atmosphere characterised by consummate class, good humour and a sense of fair play.</p>

Alpine
represented
throughout
the generations

In-keeping with the event’s ethos, this year Alpine brought along ten of its very finest models to celebrate the brand’s rebirth.

Alpine</br>represented</br>throughout</br>the generations

On the narrow road leading to the top of the hill, the 1978 Le Mans 24 Hours-winning A442B, the A460 which had repeated that feat the previous week in the LMP2 class and the Alpine Celebration – which prefigures the forthcoming road-going model – offered a public demonstration of their unmistakable agility.

On the Cartier Style et Luxe lawn, a prestigious Concours d’Elegance was held, with the Marquis – the very first Alpine prototype with its ultra-light fibreglass body, as envisioned by the brand’s founder Jean Rédélé – winning the Alpine Past and Present category. Here, visitors could discover all about the company’s history by way of an unrivalled line-up of cars including the Willys Interlagos (a version of the A108 manufactured in Brazil), a rare A110 cabriolet, two Berlinettes from 1964 and 1977 and finally the new Alpine Vision.

Similarly of interest was the Alpine A110 Meyrignac, whose avant-garde look was sketched in 1969 by a teenage Denis Meyrignac, a bold designer-in-waiting whose mock-up impressed Rédélé so much that he entrusted him with an A110 chassis upon which to build his prototype